BancaSellaServiceImpl.java

Business ServiceRapid technological advancements, growing competition and increased customer expectations have made a marketer’s job tougher than ever before. Business Services is the leading Wireless Internet Service provider in South Africa. We own our own Network and don’t rely on any third part suppliers to deliver the connection to your premises which means we can offer you the best turn around on support and installations can be done with no time.

An IT service may not be customer-facing, for example, an IT service which is seen as ‘back office’ as it supports the execution of an internal business process, such as the support for a billing process which the finance department would own and manage. Business service is a broad term encompassing an array of industries serving the needs of corporation, consumers, and citizens. It includes various sectors like finance, professional services, management of companies, administrative support, hospitality and tourism.

Through our focus on quick issue resolution, strong customer relationships and higher retention, we enable our clients to expand operations, reach more customers, and launch new products & services faster, with sustained customer satisfaction. This has been done to provide a better and unified interface due to a merger with Mayzus Financial Services Ltd. (dba MoneyPolo) earlier last year.

Business banking is a company’s financial dealings with an institution that provides business loans, credit, savings and checking accounts specifically for companies and not for individuals. Business banking is also known as commercial banking and occurs when a bank, or division of a bank, only deals with businesses. A bank that deals mainly with individuals is generally called a retail bank, while a bank that deals with capital markets is known as an investment bank.

Adam Smith ‘s book The Wealth of Nations, published in Great Britain in 1776, distinguished between the outputs of what he termed “productive” and “unproductive” labor. The former, he stated, produced goods that could be stored after production and subsequently exchanged for money or other items of value. The latter, however useful or necessary, created services that perished at the time of production and therefore did not contribute to wealth. Building on this theme, French economist Jean-Baptiste Say argued that production and consumption were inseparable in services, coining the term “immaterial products” to describe them.