Microsoft 365 Business

Business ServiceWe provide resources and information to help Canadians get their businesses going and growing. Our wealth of experience in this area has imbued the importance of understanding the relationships between technology and business operations, quality, cost, health of service and the resultant impact of these factors in various enterprise sectors – a quality that will undoubtedly benefit your business.

I would highly recommend Primelink to anybody looking for internet or phone service. We have been with them for over 14 years for our business service. The customer service is awesome, as well as all the employees that work there. The company is well known throughout the community because of all their generous donations.

USPS has multiple options for business mailings, postage, and delivery times, and well as varied services for targeting your direct mailings and making them memorable. Based on mail volume, type of mail, and destination, you may choose different services for different campaigns.

Offline, our business was already established and due to our product’s unique exclusivity and excellent quality, they were sold only through Salons. We had a very loyal and satisfied customer base but not everybody could visit those salons and we wanted to expand our customer base. We listed out a number of options and alternatives, including e-commerce but nothing seemed impactful. That’s when we came across Prione and were introduced to selling online. The Prione team helped us with a smooth onboarding process. It was surprisingly quick even though this was our first online selling experience. We now sell pan-India and as a brand constantly benefit from excellent online customer service processes that keep our customers happy and loyal.

Adam Smith ‘s book The Wealth of Nations, published in Great Britain in 1776, distinguished between the outputs of what he termed “productive” and “unproductive” labor. The former, he stated, produced goods that could be stored after production and subsequently exchanged for money or other items of value. The latter, however useful or necessary, created services that perished at the time of production and therefore did not contribute to wealth. Building on this theme, French economist Jean-Baptiste Say argued that production and consumption were inseparable in services, coining the term “immaterial products” to describe them.